Resources for Family Cases

Note: Since May 2020, conferences in family and small claims matters are being conducted by telephone, audio- or video-conference. See Virtual conferences and hearings (by phone or video) for more information.

Resolving disputes out of court
Provincial Court Family Rules and Procedure
Getting a lawyer or legal advice
Guided pathways (online planning, dispute resolution and case preparation)
Family Law Act Matters
Choosing a court for Family Law Act matters
Adult Guardianship
Child protection matters
Child and spousal support
Court forms
Preparing for a family court trial
Picklists - Standard Wording of Family Court Orders
Laws (also called statutes or legislation)
Other pages on this website


Resolving disputes out of court
[also called Consent Dispute Resolution (CDR)) or Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR)]

Provincial Court Family Rules and Procedure

Getting a lawyer or legal advice

  • Legal Aid BC - a non-profit organization providing legal information, advice and lawyers for people with low incomes.
  • AC Friendship Society - offers free workshops to help people complete legal forms. During the COVID-19 pandemic, they provide online workshops, with help by phone for victims of gendered violence and people who can’t use computers.
  • Access Pro Bono - free legal advice and lawyers’ services
  • Ask JES – free service from BC Justice Education Society providing answers to legal questions by live chat, phone or email Monday to Friday, 11:00 am to 2:00 pm
  • Family Court Duty Counsel - Legal Aid BC provides free legal advice and/or limited legal services to people with low incomes in many courthouses around the province
  • Family LawLine – lawyers provide legal advice by telephone, help preparing documents and coaching for court appearances in this Legal Aid service for people with limited income and eligible family law problems
  • How to apply for Legal Aid - Legal Aid BC provides free lawyers for some family issues to people who meet financial criteria
  • Lawyer Referral Service - free 30 minute consultation with a lawyer
  • Legal Aid BC - a non-profit organization providing legal information, advice and lawyers for people with low incomes.
  • Legal Aid Call Centre - phone to find out if you qualify for Legal Aid services - telephone interpreters can be arranged for people who don’t speak English
  • Rise Women’s Legal Centre – free legal services by law students supervised by lawyers, for people around BC who self-identify as women
  • Roster of family lawyers & paralegals offering unbundled services - Some BC family lawyers are offering “unbundled” legal services. They will help you develop a plan to resolve your problems and divide the tasks as you wish, doing only the tasks you hire them for.

Guided pathways (online planning, dispute resolution and case preparation)

  • MyLawBC – from Legal Aid BC, an interactive website about separation, divorce, family matters, and abuse & family violence. It asks you questions and uses your answers to give you a personalized action plan with steps you need to take, and services and resources to help. It includes Dialogue and Mediation Tools to help resolve disputed issues and/or create a separation agreement.

Family Law Act Matters

Choosing a court for Family Law Act matters

Adult Guardianship

  • Adult Guardianship Fact Sheets - Nidus Personal Planning Resource Centre
  • Adult Guardianship - Seniors First web page with plain language introduction to Adult Guardianship and Committeeship, links to other info, resources for professionals

Child protection matters

Child and spousal support

Court forms

  • Family court forms BC Ministry of Justice collection of forms for Adult Guardianship Act; Child, Family and Community Service Act (CFCSA); Court Order Enforcement Act; Family Maintenance Enforcement Act; Family Maintenance Enforcement Act Regulation; Interjurisdictional Support Orders Act; Provincial Court Family Rules (applying to the Family Law Act); and general forms
  • Early Resolution and Case Management Model forms (used only in Surrey and Victoria Provincial Court registries)

Preparing for a family court trial

Picklists - Standard Wording of Family Court Orders
Picklists are lists of standardized terms for court orders. They are stored in courtroom computers so a Court Clerk can use them to quickly and accurately capture the order a judge makes. When a judge decides to change the standard wording, a Court Clerk can edit the term accordingly. Picklists include letter and number codes that help the Court Clerk find a term quickly.

Laws (also called statutes or legislation)

Other pages on this website

(PDF - download acrobat reader)

This website provides general information only and should not be used as legal advice. Updated May, 2021