Resources for Family Cases

Resolving disputes out of court
Getting a lawyer or legal advice
Guided pathways (online planning, dispute resolution and case preparation)
Information on family law
Child protection matters
Child and spousal support
Court forms
Preparing for a family court trial
Picklists - Standard Wording of Family Court Orders
Laws (also called statutes or legislation)
Other pages on this website


Resolving disputes out of court
(also called “Alternate Dispute Resolution” or “ADR”)

Getting a lawyer or legal advice

  • AC Friendship Society - offers free workshops to help people complete legal forms. During the COVID-19 pandemic, they provide online workshops, with help by phone for victims of gendered violence and people who can’t use computers.
  • Access Pro Bono - free legal advice and lawyers’ services
  • Ask JES – free service from BC Justice Education Society providing answers to legal questions by live chat, phone or email Monday to Friday, 11:00 am to 2:00 pm
  • Family Court Duty Counsel - the Legal Services Society (“LSS”) provides free legal advice and/or limited legal services to people with low incomes in many courthouses around the province
  • Family LawLine – lawyers provide legal advice by telephone, help preparing documents and coaching for court appearances in this Legal Services Society service for people with limited income and eligible family law problems
  • How to apply for Legal Aid - the Legal Services Society provides free lawyers for some family issues to people who meet financial criteria
  • Lawyer Referral Service - free 30 minute consultation with a lawyer
  • LSS Call Centre - phone to find out if you qualify for Legal Aid services - telephone interpreters can be arranged for people who don’t speak English
  • Rise Women’s Legal Centre – free legal services by law students supervised by lawyers, for people around BC who self-identify as women
  • Roster of family lawyers & paralegals offering unbundled services

Guided pathways (online planning, dispute resolution and case preparation)

  • MyLawBC – from Legal Services Society, an interactive website about separation, divorce, family matters, and abuse & family violence. Its guided pathways identify the next steps you need to take, and resources and services to help. Resources include the Dialogue Tool and Mediation Tool to help resolve disputed issues and/or create a separation agreement.

Information on family law

Child protection matters

  • A Parent's Guide to Child Protection Law in BC Legal Services Society (LSS) booklet explains what happens if the Director of Child Welfare has concerns about a child's safety or plans to remove a child from the family home
  • The Child Protection Process LSS poster describes the child protection process in flow chart form for parents
  • Aboriginal Child Protection Process LSS poster gives a step-by-step overview of the Aboriginal child protection process and the rights of Aboriginal children and families in flow chart form for parents
  • CFCSA flowchart - chart shows possible stages and orders in child protection proceedings under the Child, Family and Community Service Act.

Child and spousal support

Court forms

  • Family court forms BC Ministry of Justice collection of forms for Adult Guardianship Act; Child, Family and Community Service Act (CFCSA); Court Order Enforcement Act; Family Maintenance Enforcement Act; Family Maintenance Enforcement Act Regulation; Interjurisdictional Support Orders Act; Provincial Court (Family) Rules (applying to the Family Law Act); and general forms
  • Without Notice Application Checklist for litigants - when you file a Family Law Act application without notice to the other party in Provincial Court, you will be asked to fill out this form to help a judge determine the urgency of your application

Preparing for a family court trial

Picklists - Standard Wording of Family Court Orders
Picklists are lists of standardized terms for court orders. They are stored in courtroom computers so a Court Clerk can use them to quickly and accurately capture the order a judge makes. When a judge decides to change the standard wording, a Court Clerk can edit the term accordingly. Picklists include letter and number codes that help the Court Clerk find a term quickly.

Laws (also called statutes or legislation)

Other pages on this website

(PDF - download acrobat reader)